Writing a hypothesis question

He noted the gap between human and chimpanzee intelligence, despite the fact that we share more than 98 percent of our DNA. Somewhere out there could be a being whose intelligence is that much greater than our own. They would probably have the ability to run many, many such simulations, to the point where the vast majority of minds would actually be artificial ones within such simulations, rather than the original ancestral minds.

Writing a hypothesis question

Print What is a Hypothesis? A hypothesis is a tentative, testable answer to a scientific question. Once a scientist has a scientific question she is interested in, the scientist reads up to find out what is already known on the topic.

Then she uses that information to form a tentative answer to her scientific question. Sometimes people refer to the tentative answer as "an educated guess. A hypothesis leads to one or more predictions that can be tested by experimenting.

writing a hypothesis question

Predictions should include both an independent variable the factor you change in an experiment and a dependent variable the factor you observe or measure in an experiment. A single hypothesis can lead to multiple predictions, but generally, one or two predictions is enough to tackle for a science fair project.

Examples of Hypotheses and Predictions Question Prediction How does the size of a dog affect how much food it eats? Larger animals of the same species expend more energy than smaller animals of the same type.

To get the energy their bodies need, the larger animals eat more food. If I let a pound dog and a pound dog eat as much food as they want, then the pound dog will eat more than the pound dog. Does fertilizer make a plant grow bigger?

Plants need many types of nutrients to grow. Fertilizer adds those nutrients to the soil, thus allowing plants to grow more. If I add fertilizer to the soil of some tomato seedlings, but not others, then the seedlings that got fertilizer will grow taller and have more leaves than the non-fertilized ones.

Does an electric motor turn faster if you increase the current? If I increase the current supplied to an electric motor, then the RPMs revolutions per minute of the motor will increase. Is a classroom noisier when the teacher leaves the room? Teachers have rules about when to talk in the classroom.

If they leave the classroom, the students feel free to break the rules and talk more, making the room nosier.

If I measure the noise level in a classroom when a teacher is in it and when she leaves the room, then I will see that the noise level is higher when my teacher is not in my classroom. What if My Hypothesis is Wrong? What happens if, at the end of your science project, you look at the data you have collected and you realize it does not support your hypothesis?

THE WORLD QUESTION CENTER — Page 2

First, do not panic! The point of a science project is not to prove your hypothesis right. The point is to understand more about how the natural world works. Or, as it is sometimes put, to find out the scientific truth. When scientists do an experiment, they very often have data that shows their starting hypothesis was wrong.Our dedicated team of subject experts and web developers create digital resources to support the teaching and learning of WJEC Eduqas qualifications regulated by Ofqual.

A hypothesis is a tentative, testable answer to a scientific question. Once a scientist has a scientific question she is interested in, the scientist reads up to find out what is already known on the topic.

writing a hypothesis question

“A research question is essentially a hypothesis asked in the form of a question.” To be either writing-questions, or objectives or hypotheses, but not a combination. Consider the alternative forms for writing and make a choice based on the audience for the research. Recently I’ve been writing about the way that the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are related to each other.

These three are known as the synoptic Gospels, and how they are related is known as the synoptic problem. The just-world hypothesis or just-world fallacy is the cognitive bias (or assumption) that a person's actions are inherently inclined to bring morally fair and fitting consequences to that person, to the end of all noble actions being eventually rewarded and all evil actions eventually punished.

In other words, the just-world hypothesis is the tendency to attribute consequences to—or expect. Edit Article How to Do Math Proofs. In this Article: Article Summary Understanding the Problem Formatting a Proof Writing the Proof Community Q&A Mathematical proofs can be difficult, but can be conquered with the proper background knowledge of both mathematics and the format of a proof.

Plausible | Definition of Plausible by Merriam-Webster