Savage inequalities children in americas schools

Children in America's Schools by Jonathan Kozol.

Savage inequalities children in americas schools

Read an excerpt For two years, beginning inJonathan Kozol visited schools in neighborhoods across the country, from Illinois to Washington, D. He spoke with teachers, principals, superintendents, and, most important, children.

Savage Inequalities | Jonathan Kozol

What he found was devastating. Not only were schools for rich and poor blatantly unequal, the gulf between the two extremes was widening—and it has widened since. The urban schools he visited were overcrowded and understaffed, and lacked the basic elements of learning—including books and, all too often, classrooms for the students.

Savage inequalities children in americas schools

Savage Inequalities is a savage indictment. Everyone should read this important book. A classic American muckraker with an eloquent prose style, Kozol offers.

As soon as Kozol begins leading the way through a procession of overcrowded, underheated, textbookless, barely taught classrooms, the thought he surely intended to engender begins to take form: How can this be? Indeed, an older view is returning that any attempts to educate the lower orders are doomed to fail.

Kozol exposes lemons in American educational facilities in the same way Ralph Nader attacked Detroit automobile makers. Louis, Illinois East St. Louis lies in the heart of the American Bottoms—the floodplain on the east side of the Mississippi River opposite St. To the east of the city lie the Illinois Bluffs, which surround the floodplain in a semicircle.

Towns on the Bluffs are predominantly white and do not welcome visitors from East St. Louis and adjacent towns have for decades been releasing toxins into the sewer system.

Savage inequalities children in americas schools

The pattern of concentrating black communities in easily flooded lowland areas is not unusual in the United States. Farther down the river, for example, in the Delta town of Tunica, Mississippi, people in the black community of Sugar ditch live in shacks by open sewers that are commonly believed to be responsible for the high incidence of liver tumors and abscesses found in children there.

Metaphors of caste like these are everywhere in the United States. Sadly, although dirt and water flow downhill, money and services do not. The dangers of exposure to raw sewage, which backs up repeatedly into the homes of residents in East St.

Louis, were first noticed, in the spring ofat a public housing project, Villa Griffin.Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools - Chapter 5, "The Equality of Innocence: Washington, D.C.," Summary & Analysis Jonathan Kozol This Study Guide consists of approximately 44 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Savage Inequalities.

Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools Within Within Savage InequalitiesSavage Inequalities would let their children go to schools in places would let their children go to schools in places like this where no politicians, school board like this where no politicians, school board.

Jonathan Kozol received the National Book Award for Death at an Early Age, the Robert F.

Chapter 5, "The Equality of Innocence: Washington, D.C.," Summary and Analysis

Kennedy Book Award for Rachel and Her Children, and countless other honors for Savage Inequalities, Amazing Grace, The Shame of the Nation, and Fire in the Ashes. He has been working with children in inner-city schools for nearly fifty years. Jonathan Kozol is the author of Death at an Early Age (for which he received the National Book Award), Savage Inequalities, Amazing Grace, and other award-winning books about young children and their public schools.

He travels and lectures about educational inequality and racial injustice/5().

Books on Learning and Discovery for Children and Young Adults

All About Jonathan Kozol •• Kozol first came to attention in Kozol first came to attention in Death at an Early Death at an Early AgeAge-- Documents his experiences as a substitute teacher Documents his experiences as a substitute teacher in the Boston school nationwidesecretarial.com the Boston school .

For two years, beginning in , Jonathan Kozol visited schools in neighborhoods across the country, from Illinois to Washington D.C., and from New York to San Antonio.

He spoke with teachers, principals, superintendents, and, most important, children. What he found was devastating.

Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools by Kari Gunderson on Prezi