An introduction to the history of the 1800s in the united states

For almost a century and a half, America was merely a group of colonies scattered along the eastern seaboard of the North American continent—colonies from which a few hardy souls tentatively ventured westward.

An introduction to the history of the 1800s in the united states

Syllabub Syllabub belongs to the English family of creamy dessert beverages combining dairy products and sweet wine.

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Originally a holiday beverage, syllabub invited many interesting variations based on viscosity and application. Dessert syllabubsakin to trifle, flourished in the early 20th century. Its defining characteristic is the mixing of white wine or cider or fruit juice with sweetened cream, so curdling the cream, but from earliest times it has diverged into two basic types: Both sorts remained very popular until the mid-nineteenth century As for the name syllabub, that remains a complete mystery.

Early spellings include solybubbe, sullabub, selybube, and even sillibouk, and probably it was originally just a fanciful meaningless coinage. Syllbub became the main form aroundprobably due to the influence of the word syllable.

This fortifying dessert drink was known by Tudor times and became enormously popular in colonial America. As ice cream became more available, the cool creamy syllabub came to be considered increasingly old-fashioned, although it did linger in the South Columbia SC] p.

They are not rare or exotic, but are often either colonial or betray some important British trade connection. In other words, they seem to embody the growing power of the British Empire, especially now that ordinanary housewives can purchase sugar from the West Indies, nutmeg from the Spice Islands, lemons and sherry from Spain.

The British housewife is apparently no longer aware that these were once rare and costly ingredients available only to the wealthiest consumers.

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This syllabub recipe, one of dozens, is something like a cross between an eggnog and a creamy dessert floating on wine. Westport CT] p. Fill your Sillabub pot half full with cider, and good store of sugar, and a little nutmeg, stir it well together, and put in a s much cream by two or three spoonfuls at a time, as hard as you can, as though you milkt it in; then stir it together very softly once about, and let it stand two hours before you eat it, for the standing makes it curd.

Devon]p. Mix all together witha Spponful of Orange-flower Water, beat it well together with a Whisk half an Hour, then with a Spoon fill your Glasses. These will keep above a Week, and is better made the Day before. The best Way to whip Syllabubs is, have a fine large Chocolate-mill, wich you msut keep on purpose, and a large deep Bowl to mill them in; it is both quicker done, and the Froth stronger.

When cold, turn it out, and it is a fine Flummery. Glasse also offers a recipe titled "To make Whipped Syllabubs. Take a quart of good sweet cream, put it into a broad earthen pan, with a jill of sack, the juice of a lemon or Seville orange, and the rind of a lemon cut thin; make it pretty sweet with fine powder sugar, whip it with a whisk, and as the froth rifes take it off, and put it on a sieve to drain for half an hour; then half-fill your glasses with some red, and some white wine, and with a spoon put on your syllabub as high as you can: Never make it long before you want to send it to table.

Put a bottle of either red or white wine, ale or cyder, into a China bowl, sweeten it with sugar, and grate in some nutmeg, then hold it under the cow, and milk into it till it has fine froth at the top; strew over it a handful of currants, clean washed and picked, and plumped before the fire.

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You may make this syllabub at home, only have new milk. Make it as hot as milk from the cow, and out of a tea-pot, or any such thing, pour it in, holding you hand very high. Season with milk and sugar and white wine, but not enough to curdle it; fill the glasses nearly full, and crown them with whipt cream seasoned.

Weigh seven ounces of fine sugar and rasp on it the rinds of two fresh sound lemons of good size, then pound or roll it to powder, and put it into a bowl with the strained juice of the lemons, two large glasses of sherry, and two of brandy; when the sugar is dissolved add a pint of very fresh cream, and whisk or mill the mixture well; take off the froth as it rises, and put it into glasses.

These syllabubs will remain good for several days, and should always be made if possible, four-and-twenty hours before they are wanted for table.This lesson covers the history of the United States during the s, highlighting the Louisiana Purchase, the four wars fought by the United States, and the background.

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An introduction to the history of the 1800s in the united states
Introduction – U.S. History